Our Hometown Newspaper – the Woodstock Times

I walked over to the CVS today and got the latest copy of the “Woodstock Times”.  It’s a sellout publication in Woodstock.  How could it not be?  It’s got  the latest obituaries,

stories about community events (more fun than a soap opera)

a full color picture on page 1 (always)

and, a Letters to the Editor section.

I mean, what more can we all ask for?  An  edition once offered  a full color photo of a statue of Buddha perched atop a bright blue sign saying:

WELCOME TO WOODSTOCK

We are all here because we are not all there.

I mean, how can I not buy a copy of the Woodstock Times this every week?  It’s better than any tabloid anywhere.  Donald Trump  doesn’t even have a chance with this one.

If you live in Woodstock or visit Woodstock, you can buy a souvenir bumper sticker at Houst with the Buddha post on it.  Buddha won’t be on the bumper sticker.  But, that’s not the important part of the message anyway.

Then, when you return home to wherever in the world that may be, you can display this wonderful sign which reads:  We are all Here Because We are Not all There.  Personally, I can’t think of a better souvenir of Woodstock than that.

But, back to the Woodstock Times:

Because of the propensity of cotton tops in the area,  obituaries are always popular.  A couple of winters ago we were dropping at the rate of 1 per week.   Every week  Stuart Klein and I visited in Bread Alone for a few minutes and   chatted about who died the week before.

Both Stuart and I were grateful to see spring arrive that year.  First, we were grateful to see a few forsythia blooms just to see something besides winter.  And, second, we were grateful to be alive and mentally together enough to know we were looking at forsythia blooms.

The weekly Letters section usually begins about   page 14 or so  with a letter from Howard Harris.  Howie has been sending letters to the editor for years, decades maybe.  For years, he wrote them in haiku.

Howie’s letter is traditionally the first one to go on the page.  Howie taught me many years ago (when I first began writing letters about the pantry) that the letters are more or less sorted by when they come in.    “Email your letter over on Friday, Thurman.  That way you’ll have a good chance of reading it in the Woodstock Times.”  Howie’s advice worked every week for years.

Brian quit printing my letters years ago but Howie still plugs along with his weekly letter.  A couple of years ago or so, he dropped the haiku and now uses a straight 2-4 paragraph letter denouncing any local activities involving the local Zoning Board of Appeals and whatever else he’s thinking about.  His letters have great interest  and are probably read by 95% of the people buying the Woodstock Times  weekly.  Personally, I miss the haiku.

Standard letters written by Woodstockers include:

comments on the Arab Israeli conflict,

opinion pieces on all sides of whatever local fight is in progress,

thank you letters offering recognition about a job well or poorly done.

During election season, the Letter section is filled to capacity with letters for and against the various candidates and the issues they represent.

But, no matter what’s happening, I look forward to Sparrow’s message.

One thing the Woodstock Times does not have is a list of breakins, brawls, speeding tickets.  If we want to read about that stuff, we have to buy the Daily  Freeman.  While it’s nice that the Woodstock Times  doesn’t waste space on sleaze, it gives the reader the feeling that nothing ever goes wrong around here.  This  is definitely not the case.  We have as many vandals around here as any other town but we just don’t mention them.

An important  part of the paper is the weekly listing of meetings which usually appears at the top of page 3.  These meetings are important.  Whenever a decision is brewing, interested parties and protestors need to know exactly where and when the meeting will be held.   It will never do to show up at the wrong time or place (which I did once).

Town Board Meetings are big sellers with a list of commenters who sign up a few minutes before the meeting so they can have a 2-minute “say” about anything they want in the “Public be Heard” segment of the meeting.   Always popular in this segment is  comment about any project that is just beginning, is ongoing, or is finished.

The Woodstock Times  is delivered to Woodstock stores every Thursday afternoon after 2:00.  Apart from the first section  featuring news, letters, meetings, obituaries, the second section is a real seller.  That’s the Almanac.  Everything that’s happening around here, both large and small, appears in the Almanac.

My favorite section in the whole Woodstock Times  is the cartoon by Swami Salami.  Swami Salami’s cartoon is displayed, usually, in the upper left hand corner of page 15.    My week is just not complete without seeing Michael Esposito’s  message.

Thank you for reading this blog post.  Please forward it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York


Dec. 15th – Tom Pacheco & Brian Hollander Play Peace Concert

Tom Pacheco, an extraordinary and diverse singer/songwriter/guitarist, will perform his annual Holiday  Peace Concert along with Brian Hollander on December 15th at 8:00 pm at the Rosendale Café, 434 Main Street, Rosendale.

Tom Pacheco and Brian Hollander have played together at concerts throughout the years.    This is always a favorite  concert that fans in the area look forward to all year long.  The audience always enjoys their performance.

Tom Pacheco is a personal hero of mine because of the support he gave to the food pantry.  He gave two concerts raising thousands of dollars to feed  hungry people.

I hope to see you there at the concert.  Come early,  if you can, for dinner.  The Rosendale Café does not have reservations and the food is delicious!

For more information, see

http://www. rosendalecafe.com

http://www.tompacheco.com

call 845-658-9048.

Thank you for reading this article.  Please share it with your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York

A chapter honoring Tom Pacheco is in the memoir “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore.”


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Woodstock Community Holiday Potluck on Christmas Day

Dear Neighbor, Friend, Woodstocker

Every holiday for the past 20 years or more, Woodstockers have celebrated Christmas with others in the Community Center at the annual Potluck on Christmas Day.

We all have stories and memories  as we celebrated the holiday there while we ate too much delicious food and visited with relatives, friends, neighbors.  We swapped stories, caught up on the news.

This annual potluck dinner on Christmas Day  is a true community event with everyone participating by bringing a prepared dish, helping decorate and set up the room, and then afterward, cleaning up.

This year is no exception. Toni Weidenbacher, as always,  is  at the helm.  And, this year is no exception as Toni asks for our participation.

Just as in all the other years, preparation is  needed to pull off Woodstock’s most meaningful and important event which seems like a mountain that can’t be climbed.

But, always, just as in all the other years, I know you’ll step up.  With every dollar you contribute, with every food item you donate, with every hour you volunteer, with every story you share at the potluck, you bring us all in  town one step closer to the best Community Holiday Potluck on Christmas Day ever.

And, for you to really feel like this Christmas Day Potluck is the best ever, you need to give of yourself in the preparations.  When you give, you feel as if the event is really a part of you.  You’ll have more fun that way!

What does Toni need?  What does the Potluck on Christmas Day need?  What does the community need?  Well, that depends on what you can do.

Can you bring a cooked dish…prepared and ready to serve?

Can you send a few dollars to Toni?  The funding for this year’s Potluck has disappeared.  Contact Toni at toniweidenbacher@gmail.com or at 845-679-7281.

Can you go around town on Christmas  morning  and pick up dishes that someone in the community prepared?

Can you give a child a nice Christmas gift?  Gifts are needed for all ages and all stages.

Can you donate fresh vegetables for the salad?  Someone has already donated the greens.  About 400 people are expected to attend so about 100 tomatoes are needed.  (Just to give you an idea of what might be on the list.)

For every thing you can do for the Holiday Potluck on Christmas Day at the Community Center, we are all truly, deeply, profoundly grateful – this year and every year.

Happy Holidays,

And thank you in advance for spreading the news about this article.  Please tell everyone.

Thank you for reading this article.  Please refer this post to your preferred social media network.

Peace and food for all.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York


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A Holiday Thank You Dear Reader

Dear Reader

In the spirit of the holiday season, I thank each of you for supporting my work and following the story of hungry people in America.  This has been a busy year for me.  Without your support, none of it would be possible.  However you discovered this blog and whatever keeps you returning, I thank you.

Each new reader who learns something new from the story of hungry people in America and each new reader who finds information about  the situation inspires me to continue working .  Thank you.

Each person who buys a copy of “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore” validates the story.  Each person who finds the booth at the Mower’s Meadow Flea Market strengthens  ripples of abundance and knowledge which are created there.  Thank you.

Each person who puts a dime or a dollar or many dollars in the donation jar at the booth supports the effort to feed the  hungry in our great nation.   Each person’s generosity increases the awareness of the situation.  Thank you.

Please continue reading the articles.  Your readership allows me to share the awareness, strengthening ripples of abundance even more. Thank you.

The Mower’s Meadow Flea Market closes over the winter and does not open again until May.  I seek an indoor market to winter over  where I can continue to tell  the story of the hungry in America.

Please drop by my booth wherever I am.  In the Spring, I hope to offer Reiki sessions, copies of the second edition of “A Healer’s Handbook”,  and unique bracelets designed by Michele Garner, the artist who designed the cover of “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore”.

 


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Barn Duty at the Food Pantry

It snowed a little bit last Saturday when I was at Mower’s Meadow and more is expected this week.  The books and clothing all got a mini dusting of the first snow of the season.

Whenever that happens (the first snow of the season) I always  remember one of the first things I learned about the Woodstock community and its residents when I moved here:  Labor Day means we pack away our dreams of a summer moon and drag out the brand new boots we were  waiting to put on.

And, further into the memory is the afternoons in the pantry when the cold was so cold and Bob Otto and Tony Cannistra  about froze to death in the barn.  They   distributed frozen food to the shoppers from that dirt floored room in the unpainted, uninsulated, unheated  building behind the church parking lot.

Even though the pantry couldn’t open until 3:00, Bob and Tony unlocked the barn and got to work at 2:30.  “Come on over!” they called to the crowd gathered in the parking lot.  “We’ve got chopped meats, cutlets, steaks, roasts, mac and cheese packages, frozen juices.”

2:30 in the parking lot was described by some of the volunteers as a circus.  I lovingly thought of it as a bus station in a third world country.  And, actually, I thought of it as more than that.

I once spent a couple of hours in an out-of-the-way airport in  Venezuela that was overcrowded with hundreds of gold miners who  themselves waited for planes.  They either waited for planes to get further into the interior of the country to hunt for gold or they waited for planes to return to civilization to sell what they found.  Whatever their destination, the place was packed.

But, whether we were all coming or going at the pantry, we were in a hurry, too.

In the pantry, we were always in a hurry.  The crowd was always larger than the hallway, the parking lot, and the barn entrance.  And, they wanted to get the long wait behind them  so they could have a two or three minute  shopping spree in the tiny room.

And, after the shopping, they were always in a hurry to get their new found food home because the event had taken all afternoon.  For some, it took more than just all afternoon because they got to the pantry late morning.  Hitch hikers started out early and, if they got a ride quickly, they were in the parking lot before noon.

My memory always includes a vision of Bob and Tony  taking turns to come into the hallway to warm up, whatever that meant.  Even though the hallway was crowded, there was just not quite enough body heat generated to call the place cozy…or even cool.  The place was cold.

I never said a word about the temperature because I was afraid that if I did the volunteers would walk off.  I just went about my business pretending that I wasn’t wearing two sweaters under my coat.  Volunteers made statements about the temperature of the hallway as they wore two hats.

“My hands are frozen!” Bob always remarked as he briskly rubbed them together, hoping the friction would get the heat going.  Just outside the door to the building, Bob  stomped his feet, trying to get some feeling into his cold toes.

Tony was less vocal but just as cold when he got his short break.  I always suspected that he had a small hidden flask to help warm himself up.  How else could he be so calm about fingers one degree away from frost bite?  I never saw any evidence but it was the only excuse I could find for a person in such cold weather conditions.

Because, not only were the two men standing in the cold, they were handling frozen meats, vegetables, fruits, juices.  All of it came rock solid frozen from the food bank.

Before the pantry opened, Tony also doubled as the parking lot manager which put him in the middle of the confusion.  Just the parking lot was a fulltime toughie job.  But, somehow, Tony made the parking lot and the barn distribution look easy.

But, no one complained.  Ever.  They had gotten a three-day-supply of food a week ago and it was all gone now.  They were hungry.  They were the struggling poor.

Thank you for reading this article.  Please share it with  your favorite social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York


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You are Invited to a Book Signing!

Please join me at the Mower’s Meadow Flea Market at 10:00 a.m. this coming Saturday, September 22nd  where I’ll be reading from my recently published book, “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore” and there will be a book signing  for you at that time.

Light Refreshments will be Served!

I hope you can make it to this book signing on Saturday morning.  The author talk will be interesting. The chocolate brownies promise to be delicious!  My pen will not run out of ink.

My daughter, Michele Garner, designed the cover.  My writing teacher, Cullen Thomas, came up with the title.

And, of course, what better location for the book signing  than the Mower’s Meadow Flea Market?

Then, after the author talk and the book signing, you can visit all the booths at the market!

Look forward to seeing you!

Thurman


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Come Celebrate With Me!

It’s OUT!  It’s in print!  The story has been told!  And you can get a copy of the book.  Today!  Right now!  Simply go to thurmangreco.com and order it on paypal.

Or, you can get it at a book signing.  I’m reading my book in libraries and church halls and in  independent book stores.  Check my website to find a time and place convenient for you.

What began as a project, guaranteed to take no more than two hours a month, is a calling.  Proceeds of the sale of this book (and the t-shirt) are going to feed the hungry.

The Book and the T-Shirt:

The book and the t-shirts took more than five years of work.  I went through reams and reams of paper.  Two computers blew up and one copier died of exhaustion.

Get the book, read it, and let me know how you feel about what you read.

And, please share this unbelievably exciting news!

Thank you,

Thurman Greco

thurmangreco.com

Please share this article with your preferred social media network.

 


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Gender Neutral Restrooms in Woodstock?

psychedelic glasses

On weekends, Woodstock is one crowded place.  This famous little town has much to offer:

Mowers Meadow Flea Market

Gwen’s Gems

Bread Alone

Houst

Maria’s Bazaar

Byrdcliffe

Woodstock Artists’ Association Museum

The Woodstock Drum Circle

Assorted festivals, and other weekend events throughout the year help boost the crowd.

Once you hit town, it helps to know where the restrooms are…especially because there aren’t that many and they aren’t that well advertised.  And, if it’s a gender neutral restroom you’re looking for, you may be disappointed.

The Sunflower has a restroom  located behind the produce department.  It’s used by employees, grocery shoppers, residents,  and tourists alike.   This is one busy place.

There is a public restroom in a cinder block building next to the Chamber of Commerce information stand.  This building is located right at the beginning of Rock City Road.  On busy days, you may miss it because this is where the famous tie dyed Woodstock T-shirts are sold.  The T-shirt display is actually in front of the entrance to the women’s room.

If you’re looking for a restroom during the winter…forget this one.  It closes every year after November 30th  and doesn’t open again until April 15th.

The Town Hall has a  restroom although the location in the building is not that easy to find.  It’s there, though.

The Woodstock Free Library has a restroom located  just past the children’s area.  This is actually a nice one but the library isn’t open everyday.

And, that’s about it.  The whole thing can be a bit discouraging if you have bought into the attitude Woodstockers seem to have about being on the cutting edge of every trend and attitude.

Of course, if you are eating at Landau,  or Oriole 9, you don’t have to worry.  They have facilities for their customers.

But that’s a bit of a challenge for the rest of us.  A good thing to do is to buy a cup of coffee and a pastry at Maria’s and use the restroom there.  While you’re shopping for your coffee and pastry, you just might catch sight of a local celebrity which will make for a good story when you return home.

Another option is to ask to use the restroom at the CVS.  It’s not a public restroom but the employees are sympathetic to your cause and, if the cash register lines aren’t too long, they’ll  unlock the private restroom.

Please note:  Try to leave it as clean as you found it.  If it gets  dirty too many times, they may suspend this service.

I’m really hopeful for our future here.  Trends in the area are toward gender neutral bathrooms and this is just the kind of thing Woodstockers can understand.  Gender neutral bathrooms are turning up in some neat places.The new Honest Weight Food Coop in Albany has a spiffy gender neutral restroom.   The Whitney Museum in New York City has a gender neutral restroom also.

Hope springs eternal here.  And, actually, we’ve got a better chance at a gender neutral restroom  than we have at additional sidewalks.

Thanks for reading this blog post.  The story is true and the people are real.

Please share this article on your favorite social media network and with anyone else you think might be interested.

Don’t forget to join the email list.

Thurman Greco

Photograph donated by Renee Ruwe

 

 

 

 


A Chocolate Lover’s Guide to Woodstock, NY

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Remember now,  Woodstock is a small town.  It’s  the most famous little town in America with  probably no more than 10,000 residents and over half of them are here on weekends and holidays only.

Woodstock knows how to do chocolate – this small town in Upstate New York.  And, why not?  Chocolate is, after all, extremely nutritious.  It contains antioxident flavinoids  which help ward off high cholesterol,  elevated blood pressure, strokes, and heart attacks.

Something everyone in Woodstock knows:   no one should go not even 1 day without eating chocolate.  That’s why it’s   sold all over town.

We begin our tour at Nana’s Creative Cafe, located near the intersection of 212 and 375 – right as you enter town.  Nana’s is in the same complex with Venus Adorned, EvolveD, Ed Dempsey Tattoos, and Fringe.

While Nana’s has no candy bars, it does have a bakery specializing in 10 different  desserts on any given day.  This is a chocolate lover’s dream come true.  The choice is difficult here:

gluten free chocolate dipped macaroons

brownies

white chocolate tarts

flourless chocolate macadamia nut cookies

gluten free chocolate cookies

chocolate chip cookies

chocolate filled sandwich cookies

oatmeal peanut chocolate chip cookies

flourless chocolate walnut cookies

chocolate cupcake with coconut cream cheese frosting

chocolate hostess cake.

There are other cakes and cookies without chocolate also.  You get the picture here.  Nana’s is a real sin palace.

Cross  the street and walk into the Sunflower.  There you’ll find a good supply of chocolate bars…enough to satisfy any need:

Chocolove

Oliver Kita

Organic Necks

Coco Polo

Not Your Sugar Mamas

Lucky’s

Amy’s

Organic Andy Dandy Candy Bars

Endangered Species

Green & Black’s

Alter Eco.

You’ll also find chocolate ice cream, chocolate chip cookies, and anything else organic and chocolate you can think of here.

Moving back across the street to the CVS, you’ll find a complete selection of chocolates.  For starters,  Hershey’s Candy Bars are on sale:  12 bars for $7.00.  That actually sums it all up.  If Hershey’s Candy Bars don’t work for you, CVS sells many other less expensive chocolates to include, for example,

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups

M&Ms

Kwix.

If you want to bring  a gift to a friend, CVS has gift boxes of

Whitman’s

Lindt

Ghiradelli

Russell Stover.

Chocolates are so important at the CVS that they have their own aisle.  And, truth be told, chocolate bars, and chocolate candies take up as much shelf space as shampoos.  Over in the grocery section of the store, CVS has displays of chocolate covered raisins, cranberries, almonds, etc.

Back across the street again, the Cumberland has its own chocolate candy aisle also.  It’s much smaller than the CVS but the Cumberland store is also much smaller than the CVS.  Inch for inch, the Cumberland is a great supporter of garden variety chocolate candy.

Up the street to Woodstock Meats, you’ll find a small selection of chocolate candy bars:

Hershey’s

M&Ms

They’re more into meat than chocolate.  However, the people at Woodstock Meats know that sometimes when a customer is waiting for a sandwich or a few pork chops, life is easier with a chocolate bar to ease stress of the wait.

Next on the tour is Catskill Mountain Pizza which has not one candy bar.  But, if it counts for anything, the cafe sports a brand new gelato bar.  It’s most popular flavor is  chocolate.

Next up the street is Maria’s Bazaar, an important eating establishment and tradition in Woodstock.  Maria’s is a  watering hole for many famous locals who come  to meet and socialize without anyone being the wiser.  Not even 1 chocolate bar can be found at Maria’s.  Don’t be put off by this.  Her restaurant is famous for its chocolate cupcakes, fudge, and cookies.  One cookie, her chocolate thumbprint, stands out among the assortment as a chocoholic’s dream come true.

Back across the street again, Bread Alone offers a small selection of Fruition bars in addition to their staples of chocolate cakes, tarts, croissants, and muffins.

Moving along  the street about a block is an entire Chocolate Candy Bar store operated by Fruition.  In this lovely establishment  you can find over a dozen different varieties of Fruition bars.  In addition, they have a section of the store devoted to  Curated Craft Collection Chocolates.  These chocolate bars are very special.  You probably won’t see the Curated Craft Collection anywhere else.

About 5 stores farther along  the street,  the Woodstock Emporium sells much chocolate.  Like Maria’s  there isn’t a chocolate bar in the place,  but there are 4 different flavors of fudge and a generous display of gigantic peanut butter cups.

Go along 2 more storefronts and you’ll come to Taco Juan’s.  Again, no candy bars.  But, Taco Juan has a perfectly legitimate excuse.  Taco Juan sells Jane’s Ice Cream which definitely comes in chocolate.  In the summer, crowds form on the sidewalk out front getting their chocolate fix.

Just beyond the bridge, cross back over to Peace Love and Cupcakes where you’ll find special chocolate cupcakes with a very Woodstock flair. They have other flavors, too but the chocolate ones are always popular.  Four of the most popular chocolate cupcakes include:

Jimi Hendrix

Richie Havens

Blood, Sweat, and Tears

Janis Joplin

Back across the street next to the liquor store is a new delicatessen, Provisions.  Again, there are  no candy bars but there are house made, sinfully delicious chocolate cakes and cookies.  The choice is difficult here in this new establishment open only a few months.

One block farther up the street is  Village Apothecary which, though smaller than the other pharmacies carries its share of upscale chocolate bars:

Earth Circle Organics

Lake Champlain Chocolates

Organic Nectars

This may not be the largest selection of chocolate in town but the quality is superb.  That’s how Village Apothecary works.

Moving up the road toward Bearsville, Upstate Films opens daily with excellent movies and the usual picture show snacks…with a twist.  The popcorn is made on the premises and, among the movie theater candies is a nice selection of Lucky’s chocolates.  You can now go to the movies or the Sunday morning Jam in Woodstock confident in the knowledge that, if you have a sudden yen for chocolate, you won’t go wrong with Lucky’s.

Right at the entrance of  Bearsville  lies  the Cub Market.  This tiny island of perfection sells only the best of anything it offers.  Produce, cleaning products, baked goods, breads.  Whatever it is, it’s the best available.  You can buy with confidence at the Cub Market.  Does the Cub Market offer chocolate bars?  Of Course!  Here, you will find:

Oliver Kita

Coco Polo

Green & Black’s.

Theo

Madecasse.

The Cub Market also has a bakery department with mouth watering cakes.

There’s got to be a moral to this story somewhere.  And, here’s my take on it.  Woodstockers love the good life.  They love good food, good  music, good books,  anything that is special.  That definitely includes chocolate.  In Woodstock, chocolate is its own food group.

So, my question is this:  Why don’t we have a Chocolate Festival?

http://www.oliverkita.com

http://www.Vitacost.com

http://www.thrivemarket.com

http://www.notyoursugarmamas.com

http://www.luckyschocolate.com

http://www.madecasse.com

Thank you for reading this blog.  The story is true.  The people are real.

Please share this article with your preferred social media network and your chocolate loving friends, relatives, neighbors, and enemies everywhere.

Don’t forget to join the email list.

Thurman Greco


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