Book Day Celebrations Continue at Mower’s Meadow Saturday Flea Market Next Season

Thank you to everyone who participated on the Book Day Celebration this summer at Mower’s Meadow Saturday Flea Market.

Writers, story tellers and poets celebrated their work with readings and displays of copies of their books to sell on Saturdays.

On book day, writers discussed their work with readers. Throughout the flea market season, books were available for sale at a book booth at Mower’s Meadow Saturday Flea Market.

Contributing writers included Neal Brownell, Avigayil Landsman, Mary Guiliano, Judith Kerman, Judith Boggess, Mercedes Cecilia, Erica Obey, Jeffrey Bovee, Leslie Gerber, Carmela Tal Baron, Emmanuelle Linard, Eric Siegel, Sue Simms, Lisa Mullenneau.

Much of the credit for this ongoing event goes to John and Janine Mower. They made space available for the writers and readers. They recruited writers for the project. When chairs were suddenly needed at the writer presentation, they appeared…complements of John and Janine Mower. And, they are in for the 2020 season!

Current plans include a book display table on Saturdays throughout the coming season in addition to a Book Day Celebration.

In order for our 2020 Book Day Celebration to be the ongoing celebration we look expect, I need your help. Please spread the word so we can expand our writer base.

Please spread the word so people will know they can find books every Saturday at Mower’s Meadow Flea Market in Woodstock.

Thanks!

Thurman Greco


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Calling All Area Writers! – Come to Book Day September 14th

Come!  Bring books to sign – work to read!

Join area writers at the upcoming FREE Book Day on Saturday, September 14th from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm at Mower’s Saturday Flea Market on Maple Lane in Woodstock, New York.

Book Day is an opportunity to showcase your work!

Reserve your space today.  Call me at 845-399-3967 or email thurmangreco@gmail.com.

Hope to hear from you soon!

See you there!


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Our Hometown Newspaper – the Woodstock Times

I walked over to the CVS today and got the latest copy of the “Woodstock Times”.  It’s a sellout publication in Woodstock.  How could it not be?  It’s got  the latest obituaries,

stories about community events (more fun than a soap opera)

a full color picture on page 1 (always)

and, a Letters to the Editor section.

I mean, what more can we all ask for?  An  edition once offered  a full color photo of a statue of Buddha perched atop a bright blue sign saying:

WELCOME TO WOODSTOCK

We are all here because we are not all there.

I mean, how can I not buy a copy of the Woodstock Times this every week?  It’s better than any tabloid anywhere.  Donald Trump  doesn’t even have a chance with this one.

If you live in Woodstock or visit Woodstock, you can buy a souvenir bumper sticker at Houst with the Buddha post on it.  Buddha won’t be on the bumper sticker.  But, that’s not the important part of the message anyway.

Then, when you return home to wherever in the world that may be, you can display this wonderful sign which reads:  We are all Here Because We are Not all There.  Personally, I can’t think of a better souvenir of Woodstock than that.

But, back to the Woodstock Times:

Because of the propensity of cotton tops in the area,  obituaries are always popular.  A couple of winters ago we were dropping at the rate of 1 per week.   Every week  Stuart Klein and I visited in Bread Alone for a few minutes and   chatted about who died the week before.

Both Stuart and I were grateful to see spring arrive that year.  First, we were grateful to see a few forsythia blooms just to see something besides winter.  And, second, we were grateful to be alive and mentally together enough to know we were looking at forsythia blooms.

The weekly Letters section usually begins about   page 14 or so  with a letter from Howard Harris.  Howie has been sending letters to the editor for years, decades maybe.  For years, he wrote them in haiku.

Howie’s letter is traditionally the first one to go on the page.  Howie taught me many years ago (when I first began writing letters about the pantry) that the letters are more or less sorted by when they come in.    “Email your letter over on Friday, Thurman.  That way you’ll have a good chance of reading it in the Woodstock Times.”  Howie’s advice worked every week for years.

Brian quit printing my letters years ago but Howie still plugs along with his weekly letter.  A couple of years ago or so, he dropped the haiku and now uses a straight 2-4 paragraph letter denouncing any local activities involving the local Zoning Board of Appeals and whatever else he’s thinking about.  His letters have great interest  and are probably read by 95% of the people buying the Woodstock Times  weekly.  Personally, I miss the haiku.

Standard letters written by Woodstockers include:

comments on the Arab Israeli conflict,

opinion pieces on all sides of whatever local fight is in progress,

thank you letters offering recognition about a job well or poorly done.

During election season, the Letter section is filled to capacity with letters for and against the various candidates and the issues they represent.

But, no matter what’s happening, I look forward to Sparrow’s message.

One thing the Woodstock Times does not have is a list of breakins, brawls, speeding tickets.  If we want to read about that stuff, we have to buy the Daily  Freeman.  While it’s nice that the Woodstock Times  doesn’t waste space on sleaze, it gives the reader the feeling that nothing ever goes wrong around here.  This  is definitely not the case.  We have as many vandals around here as any other town but we just don’t mention them.

An important  part of the paper is the weekly listing of meetings which usually appears at the top of page 3.  These meetings are important.  Whenever a decision is brewing, interested parties and protestors need to know exactly where and when the meeting will be held.   It will never do to show up at the wrong time or place (which I did once).

Town Board Meetings are big sellers with a list of commenters who sign up a few minutes before the meeting so they can have a 2-minute “say” about anything they want in the “Public be Heard” segment of the meeting.   Always popular in this segment is  comment about any project that is just beginning, is ongoing, or is finished.

The Woodstock Times  is delivered to Woodstock stores every Thursday afternoon after 2:00.  Apart from the first section  featuring news, letters, meetings, obituaries, the second section is a real seller.  That’s the Almanac.  Everything that’s happening around here, both large and small, appears in the Almanac.

My favorite section in the whole Woodstock Times  is the cartoon by Swami Salami.  Swami Salami’s cartoon is displayed, usually, in the upper left hand corner of page 15.    My week is just not complete without seeing Michael Esposito’s  message.

Thank you for reading this blog post.  Please forward it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York


Learn the Secret Language of Your Dog

Why does your pet . . . .

eat grass?

dislike having his feet touched?

roll in stinky things?

eat poop?

bark at butterflies?

Please join me at this fascinating workshop which will unlock the secrets of your furry friend to help you have a happier pet.  This practical fundraiser class is a guide to decode your dog’s language so you can discover the real reasons behind canine behaviors which may have mystified you.

I’ll offer this class on Sunday, September 23rd at 2:00 pm at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church, 2578 Route 212 , in Woodstock, New York, as a fundraiser.

This fundraiser benefits the Woodstock Dog Park which is  short on funds and long on a to-do list.  Volunteers at the Woodstock Dog Park are local residents, all of whom love animals as much as you do.  They devote time and energy to maintaining the park so  all of us can enjoy quality time with our pets.

The Town of Woodstock owns the land but has no budget to maintain the park.  So, we need your help.  Taking down trees after a storm and rebuilding a chain link fence are expensive but necessary if we are to continue to have a dog park for our furry companions.

Please join us for this class.  We’re asking for a donation of $15.  I’m also selling copies of my book, “A Healer’s Handbook”, for $15 at this class.   The total cost of this book will be donated to the Woodstock Dog Park at this class.

Thanks for reading this article.  Please refer this blog post to your preferred social media network.

And, finally, tell all your friends, neighbors, and  relatives about this class and urge them to attend.

Thanks again.

Thurman Greco

 

 


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Reflexology for You and Your Pet

Are  you interested in a fun afternoon with your favorite canine companion?  Then reflexology for you and your pet might be a good answer!

If your answer is “YES!” then St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church on Route 212 in Woodstock is  a good place to be on Sunday afternoon at 2:00,  June 10th when I  teach a class called Reflexology for You and Your Pet.

You’ll discover  how to offer reflexology to humans and to your four footer pets.  You will be given charts  you can use  reflexology after you leave the class.  The goal is to offer you a skill you can use beyond Sunday the 10th.

If you don’t have a favorite canine companion, you have two options.  The first is just to show up and take the class anyway.  The second is to borrow a pet from someone who can’t take the class that day.

So, whether you bring your favorite canine companion or not, you can benefit from the class and the Woodstock Dog Park will benefit from you donation.

The situation is this:  The Woodstock Dog Park Committee members work full time to maintain the park with a budget of  $000.

To raise money to improve the fence, remove dangerous trees, keep the place clean, we are having monthly fundraisers.  Each one is different and all include the presence of your special canine companion if you want to bring him/her.

We at the Woodstock Dog Park Committee hope to see you on June 10th.  Bring a friend or two with you.  We’ll all have fun!

My two books, “Healer’s Handbook” and “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore” will be for sale at this class.  All the funds received on the sale of the “Healer’s Handbook” will be donated to the Woodstock Dog Park.

Thanks!

See you there!

Thurman Greco


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Can you Help? You can Help!

Your support is crucial to the Woodstock Dog Park.  Local Dog Park volunteers are committed to providing an excellent play space for the many pets and their owners who live near it.  Volunteers know of the connection and kinship experienced between dogs and their  owners.

Volunteers maintain the grounds.  They set up the agility play equipment in the spring and maintain it throughout the year.  The Woodstock Dog Park is visited throughout the year by local dogs and their humans.  Recently, I visited the park on a day when the temperature was freezing and snow was on the way.  There were eleven cars there that morning.  So…my car made an even dozen!

Winter weather has left its mark on the dog park.  And, some fencing needs repair.  Other fencing needs replacing.  This is going to cost some money and sweat labor as well.

When you support your local Woodstock Dog Park, you strengthen your community,  offer peace and harmony and offer support to the volunteeers.  This helps support them as they work to keep the park in good repair.

In short, when you support the Dog Park you help the volunteers in their work.  Our Woodstock Dog Park cannot succeed without you!

SEND THE DOG PARK A FINANCIAL GIFT.

Our Woodstock Dog Park volunteers work hard to keep the space in excellent condition.  This takes some money.

CONSIDER A PERIODIC DONATION

It’s easy to set up a quarterly  or monthly donation in whatever amount you choose.  If you prefer to send a check, let the park treasurer know so you can get some self addressed envelopes to make the job easier.  Regular donations offer a financial flow coming to the dog park.  This is the easiest way to offer your support.

PAY A SPECIFIC BILL

Speak with the committee chairwoman or with the treasurer to select which bill you prefer to pay regularly.  The volunteers will appreciate your generosity.

GIVE A DONATION TO HONOR A FRIEND OR FAMILY MEMBER.

When you give a contribution as a gift to a friend or loved one, the Dog Park volunteer  will send a personalized card to the recipient acknowledging your gift.  Include the name and address of the honoree, along with your donation so the volunteer can do this.

SHARE THIS BLOG POST WITH EVERYONE ON YOUR EMAIL AND SOCIAL MEDIA LIST.

Spread the word.  It helps.  Really.

PRAYERS, LOVING SUPPORT, AND KIND THOUGHTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.

Thank you for supporting the Woodstock Dog Park.  You are important.  I send blessings your way.  Volunteers do not work in a vacuum.  They simply cannot succeed without your help.

TO DONATE YOUR TIME AND/OR MONEY IN SUPPORT OF THE WOODSTOCK DOG PARK, PLEASE CONTACT ME AT  thurmangreco@gmail.com FOR MORE INFORMATION.

Thanks for reading this blog post.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network.

My latest book “A Healer’s Handbook” is now available on Amazon as well as on my website:  http://www.thurmangreco.com.

Thurman Greco

 

 


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Gender Neutral Restrooms in Woodstock?

psychedelic glasses

On weekends, Woodstock is one crowded place.  This famous little town has much to offer:

Mowers Meadow Flea Market

Gwen’s Gems

Bread Alone

Houst

Maria’s Bazaar

Byrdcliffe

Woodstock Artists’ Association Museum

The Woodstock Drum Circle

Assorted festivals, and other weekend events throughout the year help boost the crowd.

Once you hit town, it helps to know where the restrooms are…especially because there aren’t that many and they aren’t that well advertised.  And, if it’s a gender neutral restroom you’re looking for, you may be disappointed.

The Sunflower has a restroom  located behind the produce department.  It’s used by employees, grocery shoppers, residents,  and tourists alike.   This is one busy place.

There is a public restroom in a cinder block building next to the Chamber of Commerce information stand.  This building is located right at the beginning of Rock City Road.  On busy days, you may miss it because this is where the famous tie dyed Woodstock T-shirts are sold.  The T-shirt display is actually in front of the entrance to the women’s room.

If you’re looking for a restroom during the winter…forget this one.  It closes every year after November 30th  and doesn’t open again until April 15th.

The Town Hall has a  restroom although the location in the building is not that easy to find.  It’s there, though.

The Woodstock Free Library has a restroom located  just past the children’s area.  This is actually a nice one but the library isn’t open everyday.

And, that’s about it.  The whole thing can be a bit discouraging if you have bought into the attitude Woodstockers seem to have about being on the cutting edge of every trend and attitude.

Of course, if you are eating at Landau,  or Oriole 9, you don’t have to worry.  They have facilities for their customers.

But that’s a bit of a challenge for the rest of us.  A good thing to do is to buy a cup of coffee and a pastry at Maria’s and use the restroom there.  While you’re shopping for your coffee and pastry, you just might catch sight of a local celebrity which will make for a good story when you return home.

Another option is to ask to use the restroom at the CVS.  It’s not a public restroom but the employees are sympathetic to your cause and, if the cash register lines aren’t too long, they’ll  unlock the private restroom.

Please note:  Try to leave it as clean as you found it.  If it gets  dirty too many times, they may suspend this service.

I’m really hopeful for our future here.  Trends in the area are toward gender neutral bathrooms and this is just the kind of thing Woodstockers can understand.  Gender neutral bathrooms are turning up in some neat places.The new Honest Weight Food Coop in Albany has a spiffy gender neutral restroom.   The Whitney Museum in New York City has a gender neutral restroom also.

Hope springs eternal here.  And, actually, we’ve got a better chance at a gender neutral restroom  than we have at additional sidewalks.

Thanks for reading this blog post.  The story is true and the people are real.

Please share this article on your favorite social media network and with anyone else you think might be interested.

Don’t forget to join the email list.

Thurman Greco

Photograph donated by Renee Ruwe

 

 

 

 


David and Suzan Saxman (local Heroes for Hunger) and the Woodstock Winter Exodus

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Every year about this time, Woodstock finds itself losing some old friends and maybe getting  new ones.  Sometimes the new ones move in right away.  Other times it takes awhile to fill the vacant storefronts.

I have a small year end ceremony in which I take several special walks through Woodstock  to identify, and say goodbye  to closing businesses.   For Sale signs are scattered all over town this year.

My first goodbye  trip around the loop this fall reminded me that the entire cluster of storefronts in the buildings across from the Woodstock Playhouse appear to be for sale.  To all prospective buyers:  this cluster of buildings has tenants  in every space but Dr. Longmore’s old office.

I notice the sign advertising the space behind the Bank of America is down.  “Is this a positive move?” I ask myself.

There’s  office space available  in the CVS building.

A bit further up the street, Not Fade Away has a sign.  Even the vacant lot next door has a for sale sign.

The old Mid Hudson Valley space is still available.  They appear to be making the best of things with a pop-up store.

The Then and Now Hair Salon has vacated its space next to Woofstock.  They even took the sign with them.

Every vacancy is a story.  Some happy, others not so.

The White Gryphon must empty soon  because Bob wants to sell the building. According to a recent Facebook posting, the White Gryphon still has about 2 weeks left.  Now  is the time to get one last item  from one of Woodstock’s favorite shops.  Please be sure to stop by before it closes for good.

In Woodstock this winter, we’re  going to love hating the building owner, “Bob” who we got to know in Susan Saxman’s book “The Reluctant Psychic.”

Suzan and David are splitting the store up.  He’s moving across the street to #68 and she’ll  do her  famous psychic readings in the building where Headstock is located.  You can find David behind Walkabout at the bright yellow staircase.

Even though they appear to be making a go of it with two locations instead of one, this proposition sounds challenging.  What we all know about Woodstock is that it’s easy to sell anything in the summer and almost impossible to turn a profit in the winter.  David plans to have the winter White Gryphon open daily from about 11:30 to 5.

Fortunately, Suzan Saxman’s book “the Reluctant Psychic” offers them an extra layer of recognition which should help overcome the empty building people will be seeing in coming months.  I heard recently that the Golden Notebook has sold out her book eight times already.  If you’re not in the area, you can also get a copy at Amazon and at Barnes & Noble.

Have you read Suzan’s book?  I did.   It’s  a different take on the psychic memoir. Suzan’s story is  well organized, interesting, and filled with answers to questions that people always want to ask.

I loved reading the book and found that it has much more depth than I ever expected.  Each chapter answers questions:

Do animals have souls?

Are we the agents of our own destiny, or are there forces bigger than ourselves at work?

How does death change us?

Are unhappy people still unhappy after they die?

Why are we born?

How does karma work?  Can we change our karma?  How?

How difficult is it to be a healer? a psychic?

Is reincarnation real?  How does it work?

What is it like in the after world?

What carries over from our past lives?

How hard is it to move from the past to the present to the future?

Does anyone remember deciding to come back?

How hard is it to be an old soul?

What about finding a soulmate?

And on and on and on.  There are many answers in this book.  The wisdom  found on the pages of “The Reluctant Psychic” is unique, special, and deep.

Thanks for reading this blog.  The stories are true and the people are real.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network and forward it to your friends who may also have interests and questions about all things psychic.

Thurman Greco

http://www.suzansaxman.com

 


A Swimsuit Summer in Woodstock

Butterfly

Summer in Woodstock can be mystical and magical.  Tourists flock to the town almost every day leaving $$$ in the stores and taking shopping bags with them.  It wasn’t always this way.  Between 2008 and 2012, shopping bags were scarce as unicorns.  People came, walked around town, got in their cars, and took off.

But, no more.  At the very least, they buy a cone at Taco Juan’s, a necklace at Gwen’s Gems and a coffee at Bread Alone.  I’m happy to see them.  And, I’m  extremely happy to see the shopping bags they carry.  When people leave carrying  shopping bags in their hands, we have a good chance of not looking at too many vacant store fronts next winter.

Two places the tourists don’t know much about are Maria’s and Harmony.  We residents can enjoy our town without too many of the tourists gawking when we visit those 2 places.

Maria’s, located across from Bread Alone and behind Sparkles,  has the best breakfast in town.  I love the place and wish I could go everyday but somehow that never happens.  I’m in the breakfast crowd but Maria’s also has wonderful food for lunch or dinner.  The pasta dishes are created with  pastas made in her daughter’s own Bella Pasta factory on Route 28.   Her salmon is to “die” for.  I love her desserts.

I occasionally go into Harmony, the local music cafe located on Mill Hill Road.  It’s right across the street from Catskill Mountain Pizza.  I occasionally go into Harmony on Monday or Tuesday evenings for a dinner of oriental food and I feel like I own the place.  No one else is in the dining room.  I usually arrive about 6:15 and the evening poetry readings or music event hasn’t begun yet.

The most summer fun event to be had in town costs not 1 cent and it’s not on Tinker Street.  The most summer fun to be had is at the corner of Tannery Brook, Ohayo Mountain Road and Millstream  Road.  Actually, it’s under the bridge there.

That’s where the summer swimming hole is.  Most of the bathers  walk past my parking lot on Tannery Brook and then past the Inn on the Millstream.  .  Young, mostly, with tiny swimsuits, they’re excited about an afternoon and early evening in the water and on the banks of the stream.  It’s a procession marked by skin, water,  and the promise of a summer moon.

Most of the excitement comes down the street as they head to the stream.  But, they don’t all walk down Tannery Brook.  Some of them drive up Millstream  Road and park along the edge of the pavement just before they get to the bridge.

And, they don’t all arrive wearing tiny swimsuits.    Some of them, the ones I used to see at the pantry every week,  don’t have the luxury of a swimsuit so they enjoy the water in their street clothes.

Every summer day, one of Woodstock’s Colorful Characters walks carefully down to the stream…alone and barefooted.  He makes a point of either getting to the stream ahead of everyone or arriving last after the place has emptied out so he can enjoy the beauty of the place, the cleansing effect of the water, all to himself.

But, swimsuit or not, after an afternoon playing in the water, they walk back on Taannery Brook much slower than when they came.  Whatever they wear will dry on its own in the summer heat.

These warm summer days and summer moons are to be enjoyed, cherished really.  For, all too soon, we’ll be wearing our new winter boots.  A seasonal ritual practiced by Woodstockers each fall is to show up in town wearing winter boots right after Labor Day.

When the winter boots come out, the swimsuit summer days punctuated by skin, water, and summer moons become a memory…maybe even less.

Thank you for reading this blog.

Please leave a comment

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network.

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Photography by Renee Ruwee

Thurman Greco

 


Woof! Woof! Woodstock Loves Its Pets. A Tribute to Joe Nicholson

Pets in general and dogs   in particular are beloved in Woodstock.  The whole town  is a very pet friendly place.  For starters, they’re welcome at the Library, in the gardens of local cafes, and at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church.

They’re very welcome at the Woodstock Dog Park and at The Comeau, a special place in the center of town and in the hearts of the townspeople.

For years now, dogs and their owners have been walking  on the Comeau property.  It’s easy to get to that space.  Just turn on to Comeau Drive at the Village Apothecary and go up the hill to the top parking lot.  Park your rig, and take off.  It’s a great public space.

A dog friendly area, it’s definitely not a play park.  Owners are expected to keep their pets leashed at all times.   Dogs are welcome on most trails but not on the athletic fields.

Important here:  The Stan Longyear meadow is mowed for farm animal food so dog waste and sticks are forbidden.

As with any well used public space, there are rules:

Leash up your dog while still in your car and then keep it leashed.

Pick up waste after your dog.

In 2012, Fran Breitkopf and and several townspeople got together and planned a dog park.  They went to  Jeff Moran, the Supervisor,  and to the Town Board for approval  and some unused land.   The result  is as perfect as a dog park can be.  With Fran Breitkopf at the helm, how could it be anything else?

The Dog Park Committee got it’s start with the group receiving some start up supplies from the town:  fencing, gates, shovels, etc.  An important note:  The Woodstock Dog Park is a financially sustaining and independent entity.  No town funds are used for the upkeep of this space.

Committee members donated time and sweat to make the dream a reality.  One volunteer  was Joe Nicholson.  His commitment was a reflection of his commitment to his Akita, Odessa.  I sensed he was building a park for her and for all dogs like her.

Joe worked almost daily in the first year to create a safe and inviting space for everyone to use.  Once the Woodstock Dog Park was a reality, he continued working to keep it that way.  His commitment was more than typical…it was outstanding.  He mended  fences, chopped down trees, spread mulch, fixed gates.

The result is a lovely forested area  with the Big Dog Park and the Small Dog Park securely fenced off.  The spaces are large enough to have agility areas for the dogs.

The Woodstock Dog Park is an off-leash park designed so dogs can play and exercise in a beautiful, safe, and natural setting.

There are, of course, some rules which I won’t  go into here except to share my 2 favorite ones:

Owners must fill any holes their dogs dig.

Spike, prong, chain, and electronic collars are prohibited.

This park is free and open to all good dogs and their human companions.  Located less than 5 minutes from the Woodstock Village Green, the Woodstock Dog Park is open every day of the year from dawn until dusk.

Getting there is easy:  drive on 212 heading toward toward Bearsville.

Just past the fire house No. 1 (on the right), you’ll see the now closed Gypsy Wolf Restaurant on your left.  This is at the intersection of Dixon Avenue (on the left).

Turn left here and drive a long block down Dixon Ave. until you get to the Baseball field (on the left).

Turn left again and drive about 100 feet to the end of the road.  You’ll see the  parking area on your right.  At the end, there is a trail to the Big Dog Park and the Small Dog Park.

The Woodstock Dog Park is open every day of the year from dawn until dusk.

I’ve personally never been there when the dog park was crowded.

Dog waste bags are available.

My absolute favorite time to take my Chihuahuas to the Woodstock Dog Park is Christmas Morning.  It’s a tradition in our family.

I can’t end this post without sharing that Joe Nicholson  died recently in a kayaking accident.  His untimely death has been difficult for all of us on the Woodstock Dog Park Committee. We  mourn this loss.  The old saying  that “no one is irreplaceable” is hard to accept here.  Things will continue.  Fences will get mended.  Trees will get trimmed.  Mulch will get spread.  We will all work together.  But, we on the Woodstock Dog Park Committee will have heavy hearts.

http://www.woodstockdogpark.org.

Thanks for reading this blog.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network.

Don’t forget to join the email list.

Thurman Greco


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