David and Suzan Saxman (local Heroes for Hunger) and the Woodstock Winter Exodus

Page0004 (1)

Every year about this time, Woodstock finds itself losing some old friends and maybe getting  new ones.  Sometimes the new ones move in right away.  Other times it takes awhile to fill the vacant storefronts.

I have a small year end ceremony in which I take several special walks through Woodstock  to identify, and say goodbye  to closing businesses.   For Sale signs are scattered all over town this year.

My first goodbye  trip around the loop this fall reminded me that the entire cluster of storefronts in the buildings across from the Woodstock Playhouse appear to be for sale.  To all prospective buyers:  this cluster of buildings has tenants  in every space but Dr. Longmore’s old office.

I notice the sign advertising the space behind the Bank of America is down.  “Is this a positive move?” I ask myself.

There’s  office space available  in the CVS building.

A bit further up the street, Not Fade Away has a sign.  Even the vacant lot next door has a for sale sign.

The old Mid Hudson Valley space is still available.  They appear to be making the best of things with a pop-up store.

The Then and Now Hair Salon has vacated its space next to Woofstock.  They even took the sign with them.

Every vacancy is a story.  Some happy, others not so.

The White Gryphon must empty soon  because Bob wants to sell the building. According to a recent Facebook posting, the White Gryphon still has about 2 weeks left.  Now  is the time to get one last item  from one of Woodstock’s favorite shops.  Please be sure to stop by before it closes for good.

In Woodstock this winter, we’re  going to love hating the building owner, “Bob” who we got to know in Susan Saxman’s book “The Reluctant Psychic.”

Suzan and David are splitting the store up.  He’s moving across the street to #68 and she’ll  do her  famous psychic readings in the building where Headstock is located.  You can find David behind Walkabout at the bright yellow staircase.

Even though they appear to be making a go of it with two locations instead of one, this proposition sounds challenging.  What we all know about Woodstock is that it’s easy to sell anything in the summer and almost impossible to turn a profit in the winter.  David plans to have the winter White Gryphon open daily from about 11:30 to 5.

Fortunately, Suzan Saxman’s book “the Reluctant Psychic” offers them an extra layer of recognition which should help overcome the empty building people will be seeing in coming months.  I heard recently that the Golden Notebook has sold out her book eight times already.  If you’re not in the area, you can also get a copy at Amazon and at Barnes & Noble.

Have you read Suzan’s book?  I did.   It’s  a different take on the psychic memoir. Suzan’s story is  well organized, interesting, and filled with answers to questions that people always want to ask.

I loved reading the book and found that it has much more depth than I ever expected.  Each chapter answers questions:

Do animals have souls?

Are we the agents of our own destiny, or are there forces bigger than ourselves at work?

How does death change us?

Are unhappy people still unhappy after they die?

Why are we born?

How does karma work?  Can we change our karma?  How?

How difficult is it to be a healer? a psychic?

Is reincarnation real?  How does it work?

What is it like in the after world?

What carries over from our past lives?

How hard is it to move from the past to the present to the future?

Does anyone remember deciding to come back?

How hard is it to be an old soul?

What about finding a soulmate?

And on and on and on.  There are many answers in this book.  The wisdom  found on the pages of “The Reluctant Psychic” is unique, special, and deep.

Thanks for reading this blog.  The stories are true and the people are real.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network and forward it to your friends who may also have interests and questions about all things psychic.

Thurman Greco

http://www.suzansaxman.com

 

Menu